Using DISC as a Consulting Tool

DISC Wheel used in ConsultingHaving a Team or Department execute DISC reports allows y0u to do some amazing consulting work. As an OD Consultant I have used the Team DISC reports to identify potential problems.

What I use are the patterns of the DISC graphs especially the comparison of Graph One – the adapted style – and Graph Two – the natural style – of the individuals in the team. In this case I watching for group dynamics regarding changes between the two Graphs.

If there is a wholesale movement of all the natural DISC patterns to a pattern dominated by the “C” element, I know something is going on within the group. There are several common causes – such as…

Four Primary Reasons for Team or Group Behavioral Change

  • A Weak or Poor Manager
    This is particularly apparent when you are doing multiple groups at the same time and you notice one team whereby the entire team has moved to the “C” element – no matter where their primary core element was in their natural style. This is a strong sign of a bad manager who is making life difficult for the group with tough or unusual demands. Here you will need to explore the causes of this change in behaviors. The entire team is playing not to lose, which usually translates into poor performance – yet, they have played by the rules therefore cannot be fired.
  • Rumors of Job Cuts
    Here the effects of rumors – true or false – impact the performance of the team. You will find this especially from the “S” core element personnel who are very concerned about job security. These “S” types will lose productivity due to consistent worrying about their job security and discussing the rumors with their associates (likely other “S” types) rather than staying focused upon their immediate job performance. In this situation, you will need to address the rumors head on and in a logical method to calm the fears of the core “S” group. Win their trust and keep them focused upon the necessary performance standards and the work results will take care of their job security.
  • Strict Corporate Controls
    This one is tougher to call due to the possible “political” nature of the issues in play. When the corporate policies are too overbearing and are being forced into the performance standards, you will have a group as well as individual reactions whereby they become more core “C” focused. Again, you have a group focused upon playing not to lose rather than finding new ways to perform at higher rates. Sometimes I have found a “micro – managing” executive responsible for this change in basic behavioral patterns. You must explore the landscape of the corporate environment. Use the Law of Cause and Effect to locate the true reason for these unnecessary changes.
  • A Take “No Risk” Culture
    This one is related to the third issue – Strict Corporate Controls – yet, I have found this to be related more to the “we have always done it this way” approach going too far. The effect is to lose sight of the need for innovation and creativity from all parties within the organization. No one is willing to try anything new or different for fear of dismissal, abuse, rejection or getting stuck in a dead end position without any hope of promotion. Unfortunately, when this culture takes absolute control of an organization, the organization itself is usually headed for a slow and agonizing failure or divestiture. Here is where a great leader will take a smaller group and focus upon a breakthrough project without the controls or pressure of the status quo holding them back. Ford Motor Co is a good example when you consider what the Tauras development team accomplished in designing an automobile that set records for sales. This team was picked by the leader and created a new performance standard for the development of a new automobile in a company that was void of innovation and creativity at the time. To change this pattern of behavior, you will need a very strong leader in an executive role to lead the overall change in culture. Empowerment  and engagement are critical components for this transformation to be successful.

These are just a few of the advantages of having teams take the DISC assessments. The obvious reasons for a team to have this information is for effective communication, conflict resolution and finally improved matching of your talent’s strengths to their job requirements. When you take the time to learn more about the Power of DISC within your organization, your people will be more engaged, creative and focused upon high performance achievement.

If you want more information about the DISC assessments as well as additional assessment sciences, contact Voss Graham at 901-757-4434 or use the Contact form on this website. (Sorry the email is not included here – this is due the hackers using robots and spiders to find our emails and then send us junk. Since I’m a real person, I prefer to deal with real people rather than robots. 🙂   )

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Voss Graham

Sr Business Advisor / CEO at InnerActive Consulting Group Inc
Your Knowledgeable Partner for Business Success and Achievement. Dedicated to helping others get to their next level of success. Award winning business advisor; coach to executives and business owners; Business Growth Strategist; and experienced using assessments for hiring & selection, evaluation of teams and improving communication. Voss is available as a Speaker for your conferences or company meetings contact him at 901-757-4434 or use the LinkedIn or Facebook direct messages.
About The Author

Voss Graham

Your Knowledgeable Partner for Business Success and Achievement. Dedicated to helping others get to their next level of success. Award winning business advisor; coach to executives and business owners; Business Growth Strategist; and experienced using assessments for hiring & selection, evaluation of teams and improving communication. Voss is available as a Speaker for your conferences or company meetings contact him at 901-757-4434 or use the LinkedIn or Facebook direct messages.

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