How to Recognize a Politican – Using Motivators

I’m often asked about how the Motivator patterns can be used in evaluating talent. And, specifically how to recognize someone who is driven to perform at high levels rather than someone who is focused upon politics.

In my experience there are two different patterns which tell me to look deeper into a individual’s true drive. Is this person a performance driven person or a politically driven person?

Okay, pattern number one…

When I see all six motivators with plot patterns all + or – 2 points from the mean – then I have a true politician. I use the willow tree as an example of this person. The willow tree possesses little strength in structure. In fact, it’s branches are small and whip around at the mercy of the wind direction. Therefore, like the willow tree, the individual stands for nothing while moving with the directional flow of the moment.

The second pattern is a little more complicated yet here are the elements within the pattern telling you more about the individual. I can even state the pattern I about to describe is actually more of the pattern found in most politicians rather than limited to organizational politicians.

This pattern will have the Social, Individualistic and Traditional all above the means – usually with the individualistic at the highest point, followed by the Traditional and Social.

The wildcards in these patterns is the Traditional and the Utilitarian.

The Traditional is always a wild card since you have to ask questions of the individual to learn about their philosophies in life. The more their philosophies are aimed at the political environment, the more likely they will want to be in politics.

The Utilitarian is also a wild card here since a low score will move the individual more to the social side of things like social workers and religious types. The higher the utilitarian the more they want in the form of returns and economic value. The utilitarian driver will usually be number four in terms of points scored, yet, will influence the individual to gain returns ( and a paycheck). In some cases I have seen the utilitarian drive create a drive or decisions to be made to insure a high paying pension program in the future.

Your key is to watch the intensity levels of the four specific motivators discussed and you will observe the decisions and concepts openly discussed by the individual. It will confirm the political nature of an individual.

Remember, most high performers only have true passion in the utilitarian and individualistic drivers or motivators. By the way, when talking about high performers within this concept – I really only addressing the business world of executives, managers, team leaders and sales personnel. Other positions can be driven by other motivators and have high levels of success with their personal pattern of motivators. An example would be a graphic artist would need a very high aesthetic motivator to drive the creativity and art forms necessary for this position.

The following two tabs change content below.

Voss Graham

Sr Business Advisor / CEO at InnerActive Consulting Group Inc
Your Knowledgeable Partner for Business Success and Achievement. Dedicated to helping others get to their next level of success. Award winning business advisor; coach to executives and business owners; Business Growth Strategist; and experienced using assessments for hiring & selection, evaluation of teams and improving communication. Voss is available as a Speaker for your conferences or company meetings contact him at 901-757-4434 or use the LinkedIn or Facebook direct messages.
About The Author

Voss Graham

Your Knowledgeable Partner for Business Success and Achievement. Dedicated to helping others get to their next level of success. Award winning business advisor; coach to executives and business owners; Business Growth Strategist; and experienced using assessments for hiring & selection, evaluation of teams and improving communication. Voss is available as a Speaker for your conferences or company meetings contact him at 901-757-4434 or use the LinkedIn or Facebook direct messages.

Comments are closed.